Hawaii Money – Island Crisis http://islandcrisis.net/ Wed, 18 May 2022 05:05:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://islandcrisis.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1-150x150.png Hawaii Money – Island Crisis http://islandcrisis.net/ 32 32 Hawaii State FCU taps Lumin Digital to improve banking services https://islandcrisis.net/hawaii-state-fcu-taps-lumin-digital-to-improve-banking-services/ Wed, 18 May 2022 05:05:14 +0000 https://islandcrisis.net/hawaii-state-fcu-taps-lumin-digital-to-improve-banking-services/ Hawaii State Federal Credit Union has signed a multi-year agreement with Lumin Digital for its cloud-native platform for online and mobile digital banking solutions. Hawaii State FCU partners with Lumin Digital for services Lumin Digital is a cloud-native digital banking platform that provides a personalized experience for credit union members through automation. The company says […]]]>

Hawaii State Federal Credit Union has signed a multi-year agreement with Lumin Digital for its cloud-native platform for online and mobile digital banking solutions.

Hawaii State FCU partners with Lumin Digital for services

Lumin Digital is a cloud-native digital banking platform that provides a personalized experience for credit union members through automation.

The company says it helps financial institutions better engage with their users through personalized recommendations and communications to improve their financial habits and simplify day-to-day transactions.

It offers spending insights, the ability to set savings goals, and real-time notifications and fraud alerts.

“At Hawaii State FCU, we are committed to investing in technology and innovation so that our members can manage their money with greater security and convenience,” said Genesis Nicklaw, Vice President of Electronic Assistance Services in Hawaii. State FCU.

“We identified Lumin Digital as a partner because they align with our vision to provide an easy-to-use personalized digital experience for our members.”

Lumin Digital will support Hawaii State FCU’s more than 120,000 customers once the credit union goes live on its platform in June 2022.

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Hawaii DOE teachers may be eligible for a grant to purchase school supplies https://islandcrisis.net/hawaii-doe-teachers-may-be-eligible-for-a-grant-to-purchase-school-supplies/ Sun, 15 May 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://islandcrisis.net/hawaii-doe-teachers-may-be-eligible-for-a-grant-to-purchase-school-supplies/ May 15, 2022, 12:00 PM HST * Updated May 14, 4:17 p.m. Eligible Hawaiian public school teachers will receive up to $500 each for school supplies under a Hawai’i State Federal Credit Union grant program called “Investing in Education.” The Hawai’i State Federal Credit Union will distribute a total of $40,000 in grants of up […]]]>

May 15, 2022, 12:00 PM HST
* Updated May 14, 4:17 p.m.

Eligible Hawaiian public school teachers will receive up to $500 each for school supplies under a Hawai’i State Federal Credit Union grant program called “Investing in Education.”

The Hawai’i State Federal Credit Union will distribute a total of $40,000 in grants of up to $500 to teachers to help them purchase books, furniture, electronics and other classroom necessities. Applications are available until June 30.

Applicants must be members of the Hawaii State FCU and currently employed by the Hawaii State Department of Education as a teacher. Grant recipients are selected based on responses to applications and will be considered in the order in which they are submitted.

Participants must submit an application outlining the needs of their class and how the funds will help them improve student learning. Funds will be available until June 30 or until all money has been disbursed.

“We appreciate Hawaii’s public school teachers for all they do and recognize the tremendous sacrifices they make every day – especially over the past two years,” said Andrew Rosen, President and Chief from the management of the Hawaii State Federal Credit Union in the press release.

THE ARTICLE CONTINUES UNDER THE AD

To apply for the Investing in Education grant program or for more information, visit the website.

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Finding your mother tongue: the “valid risk” of singer-songwriter Isabeau Waia’u Walker pays off https://islandcrisis.net/finding-your-mother-tongue-the-valid-risk-of-singer-songwriter-isabeau-waiau-walker-pays-off/ Sat, 14 May 2022 13:00:04 +0000 https://islandcrisis.net/finding-your-mother-tongue-the-valid-risk-of-singer-songwriter-isabeau-waiau-walker-pays-off/ Your browser does not support the audio element. For more than a decade, Isabeau Waia’u Walker worked in education while moonlighting as a musician. Although Waia’u Walker dreamed of playing music full time, she insists teaching wasn’t just a day job. “I wanted to be a teacher,” says Waia’u Walker, who grew up in Hawaii […]]]>

For more than a decade, Isabeau Waia’u Walker worked in education while moonlighting as a musician. Although Waia’u Walker dreamed of playing music full time, she insists teaching wasn’t just a day job.

“I wanted to be a teacher,” says Waia’u Walker, who grew up in Hawaii but lives in Oregon City, Oregon. “I did not enter the profession as a first step to get into music. I didn’t go into it just because there was some semblance of stability, schedule, salary and expectations. I really wanted to be with the students and the families in this space.

Despite this passion for teaching, the dream finally won out three years ago when she decided to quit her job at Canby High School to pursue a career in music.

His timing wasn’t great.

The pandemic has upended the music industry and left Waia’u Walker unable to perform live music, a devastating blow for a budding artist. Undeterred, she continued to write, and her “worthy risk,” as she calls her decision to change careers, paid off this month with a debut album titled “Body” (due out May 15).

Cover of the album “Body” by Isabeau Waia’u Walker

Cooper U. Pattison

The 12 songs on the new album explore the dramatic change she’s been through, as well as some of the shared traumas we’ve all experienced during the pandemic. But Waia’u Walker’s reconnection with his Hawaiian heritage is perhaps the most striking theme on the record. “Body” even features several songs with lyrics sung in the Hawaiian language, including the album’s stunning “The Prince” which tells a deeply personal family story.

Singing in Hawaiian is a relatively new part of Waia’u Walker’s repertoire. In the late 1800s, the language was banned in the Hawaiian Islands and this ban was not officially lifted until 1986. Because of this, the language almost became extinct. Waia’u Walker says it was not spoken in her childhood home and her father was discouraged to learn it.

“My dad had to work on his own relationship with the language because he had been taught for so long that the only way for the world to take you seriously and survive because you didn’t have to [use the language]says Waia’u Walker.

In recent years, attitudes have changed and opportunities to learn the language have multiplied. This extends to Waia’u Walker’s family and his art.

“Honestly, the more my dad found healing in connecting [with the language]it had a ripple effect in our family,” she says.

Read his interview with OPB below.


Jerad Walker: You have a really interesting background. You were a school teacher for many years and left that profession in 2019 to pursue music full time. I imagine that the transition had a great influence on this corpus.

Isabeau Waia’u Walker: It was a huge change, not only because it was a different career choice and the risks involved, but because I wanted to be a teacher, I didn’t come into the profession as a first step to get into music. I didn’t go into it just because there was some semblance of stability, schedule, salary and expectations. I really wanted to be with the students and the families in this space.

And so this letting go of titles, letting go of security and even who I thought I was as a teacher to step into this new space – it’s really exciting. But honestly, I felt like I had turned my life upside down on purpose. But then it was a really worthwhile risk.

JW: The timing must have been tough with the pandemic, though.

IWW: Yeah. Well, a lot of people who hear that I was a teacher are like, “Oh, you left because of the way the [post-pandemic] world has changed education and teaching. It must have been tough. And I always have to come back with, “No, I left right before COVID.”

JW: Well, in a weird way, it’s pretty hard to pinpoint which profession has been hit the hardest. Education or music.

IWW: Yeah, I have friends who are still teachers and when I hear about the stress and strain they go through, the stress and strain they witness from their student…I don’t know which one was the most affected, but I play ping-pong between despair and gratitude. [laughter]

JW: You live in Oregon City but grew up in Hawaii and have Pacific Islander heritage. How does this island background influence your music?

IWW: I think it shows most in the who and what of what I write. But probably on first listen, first look, I don’t know if people will understand this stuff.

JW: I feel like your song “Rolled Over” jumps out at the listener on that. It looks like you’re exploring the back and forth between two different identities. There are striking lyrics in there that say “You will hear the oceans speak in speckled but frozen seashells among the roots of the evergreens.”

IWW: This song is exactly about pushing and pulling and I actually found a stability, even if those things are not resolved, somehow in this medium, the back and forth. come. I feel the most understood [in that place].

Isabeau Waia'u Walker

Isabeau Waia’u Walker

Cooper U. Pattison

JW: You also sing in Hawaiian [ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi] on some of the songs that come later in the album. Was the Hawaiian language part of your upbringing and what is the cultural significance there?

IWW: For me, it’s very important because the Hawaiian language has been banned for so long. The generation my dad grew up in – he heard it mostly at home or, for him, in church. It’s a way for many Hawaiians to keep the languages, to settle for translating hymns and scriptures. And because it was within church boundaries, it was a nice, sneaky way to keep him around her. But it’s stuck in the story as a song. And my dad had to work on his own relationship with the language because he had been taught for so long that the only way for the world to take you seriously and survive because you didn’t have to [use the language].

Honestly, the more my dad found healing in the connection [with the language]it was like a ripple effect in our family.

JW: Your album ends with a great song called “The Prince”, which seems like a pretty direct nod to your heritage. Can you tell me about this song?

IWW: Yeah. So “The Prince” is a song I wrote for my dad. It comes from a story my father told me. When he was three years old, he lost his father in a drunk driving accident and that moment is kind of the breaking point for our family.

And part of the money [accident] The settlement allowed my grandmother Hawea to send her to a really nice boarding school on the Big Island. My father, to this day, will say academically that was a great privilege. But on all other fronts, these were some of the worst years of his life. He was just the odd man out there completely – racially, culturally, even though it was Hawaii, and certainly socio-economically.

Fast forward to the end of his high school career in Hawaii. There are big high school diplomas [every year on the islands]. Everyone is covered in necklaces and families come out. It’s a big problem. He invited his mother, my grandmother, his brothers, my uncles and then Aunt I’o [who was very well-respected in the community]. And he has this memory of the big high school graduation. Everyone takes their lei and talks to their family members and he sees Aunt I’o approaching him. And the school chaplain, who had just given him so much hell since he was 12, he never felt like he belonged with those people. So this chaplain walks past and tries to intercept Aunt I’o and chat, let’s network and connect with someone who is well known in the community [kind of thing]. And Aunt I’o said, “I’m here for Kaleo.” My father’s name is Kaleo. And she passed the chaplain and walked towards my father.

And my father, [who was telling me this story while] sitting on the edge of my bed was like, “I felt like a prince – to be seen, especially in this crowd, as his most important thing.”

So this song comes from there. And the anthem, the ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi, the Hawaiian parts of the song are not my direct lyrics. It’s an old hymn. Even though it seems to run counter to the themes of colonialism in the verses, to me this is where the language was held and held and allowed me access. And it held my family together. So even though it came through the church that hurt a lot, it was also a place where we were bonded and safe. Yeah, the song “The Prince” is for my dad, but it’s definitely for all the kids at home.

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EPA visits wastewater treatment facilities: Regional administrator offers advice on money for upgrades https://islandcrisis.net/epa-visits-wastewater-treatment-facilities-regional-administrator-offers-advice-on-money-for-upgrades/ Thu, 12 May 2022 10:11:08 +0000 https://islandcrisis.net/epa-visits-wastewater-treatment-facilities-regional-administrator-offers-advice-on-money-for-upgrades/ The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the environmental law nonprofit that successfully sued Maui County are watching how Hawaii County plans to handle similar waste disposal issues. waste. A delegation led by EPA Region 9 Administrator Martha Guzman toured the Hilo Wastewater Treatment Plant on April 6, had a working lunch with Mayor Mitch Roth […]]]> ]]> Goose Creek Navy Officer on ‘Wheel of Fortune’ Wins Big, Donates Locally, and Moves to Hawaii | Charleston scene https://islandcrisis.net/goose-creek-navy-officer-on-wheel-of-fortune-wins-big-donates-locally-and-moves-to-hawaii-charleston-scene/ Tue, 10 May 2022 14:52:00 +0000 https://islandcrisis.net/goose-creek-navy-officer-on-wheel-of-fortune-wins-big-donates-locally-and-moves-to-hawaii-charleston-scene/ A former Goose Creek-based Navy commander who left the base in April for his next assignment beat two opponents to win “Wheel of Fortune.” Samantha “Sam” Savage’s episode aired on May 6 and revealed that she walked away with a total of $23,500 in cash. Savage, who frequently watches “Wheel of Fortune” with her mother, […]]]>

A former Goose Creek-based Navy commander who left the base in April for his next assignment beat two opponents to win “Wheel of Fortune.”

Samantha “Sam” Savage’s episode aired on May 6 and revealed that she walked away with a total of $23,500 in cash.

Savage, who frequently watches “Wheel of Fortune” with her mother, said she was finally able to check off an item on the to-do list.

“The experience has been incredibly exciting for me,” Savage told The Post and Courier. “I wouldn’t trade it for anything.”

Her episode was taped in February and COVID-19 protocols were still in place. This meant she applied online instead of attending the usual in-person recruitments and had to wear a mask and social distance backstage during the broadcast. Workers cleaned the spinning wheel during every commercial break, she said.

Savage was in the last taping of the day. The show records five consecutive episodes, which means it spent a lot of time in the studio before watching other contestants.

She was also able to speak briefly with hosts Pat Sajak and Myrtle Beach native Vanna White.

“They asked us what our strategy was, and I said mine was ‘if I have money, I buy vowels,'” Savage said. “Pat said it was a good one.”


Charleston area teacher, librarian and DJ on

Savage played civil engineer Brad Brophy and software sales manager Brandi Crown, and his high resolution of the game was nearly a disaster.

The puzzle was “The Los Angeles Rams are Super Bowl champions,” but Savage almost named the wrong sports team.

“I almost said ‘Rays’ but changed it to ‘Rams’ in time,” she said.

She won $11,500 for that resolution, then took the win with “I had a good run” on the last lap. During her play, she landed on the infamous $10,000 space or bankrupt and risked it for the reward.

Even though she didn’t solve the bonus riddle – “Who would have thought of ‘quality’ as an expression?” she said – Savage had the experience of a lifetime and made a lot of money.


The travel enthusiast who has explored much of the world during her Navy career hoped to win a cruise or vacation on the show, but said she would take the opportunity to pay her bills and make a donation to a Charleston charity for which she had volunteered.

She plans to make an annual donation of her winnings to My Sister’s House, a nonprofit that seeks to eliminate domestic violence in the tri-county area.

His next destination in the Navy is a vacation spot in itself. The commander, who has been in the Navy for 32 years, has just been posted to Pearl Harbor in Oahu, Hawaii.

While living in the Charleston area, Savage and her husband fished extensively and visited numerous South Carolina state parks. She can’t wait to explore nature in Hawaii and introduce her son and two grandsons to their new home.

Savage hopes to retire there after his next three-year contract, but said he will miss Charleston, which was at home for two years.

Get a weekly list of tips on pop-ups, last-minute tickets, and little-known experiences curated by our newsroom delivered to your inbox every Thursday.

Reach Kalyn Oyer at 843-371-4469. Follow her on Twitter @sound_wavves.

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Ex-cop gets 5 years for brutal arrest of woman with dementia https://islandcrisis.net/ex-cop-gets-5-years-for-brutal-arrest-of-woman-with-dementia/ Fri, 06 May 2022 00:04:00 +0000 https://islandcrisis.net/ex-cop-gets-5-years-for-brutal-arrest-of-woman-with-dementia/ DENVER (AP) — A former Colorado police officer shown on body camera video roughly arresting a 73-year-old woman with dementia and later seen joking about it with co-workers was sentenced Thursday to five years in prison. Austin Hopp arrested Karen Garner in 2020 after she left a store without paying for about $14 worth of […]]]>

DENVER (AP) — A former Colorado police officer shown on body camera video roughly arresting a 73-year-old woman with dementia and later seen joking about it with co-workers was sentenced Thursday to five years in prison.

Austin Hopp arrested Karen Garner in 2020 after she left a store without paying for about $14 worth of items in Loveland, about 80 miles north of Denver. Police body camera video shows that after she turned away from him, he grabbed her arm and pushed her to the ground, still holding the wildflowers she had picked then she was crossing a field.

Hopp had faced probation of up to eight years behind bars after pleading guilty to second-degree assault in March under a deal with prosecutors that Garner’s family had opposed. He had faced a mandatory prison sentence of between 10 and 32 years under a more serious original assault charge.

Footage shows that when Hopp pushed Garner against the hood of her car, she tried to turn around and repeated that she was trying to get home. He then pushed her back against the car and moved his bent left arm close to her head, holding it, saying, “Are you done?” Have you finished? We don’t play this game.

A federal lawsuit Garner filed claimed he had dislocated his shoulder. The city settled the lawsuit for $3 million, a sum that her family says will pay for the 24-hour care she needed after her condition deteriorated following her arrest.

Police station surveillance video released by Garner’s attorney showed Hopp and others talking and sometimes laughing or joking about the arrest as they watched body camera footage with Garner in a cell detention nearby. At one point, Hopp told the others to listen for the “pop” during the part of the sequence where Garner’s shoulder was allegedly dislocated.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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Hawaii Legislature Passes Bill Raising Minimum Wage to $18 | Your money https://islandcrisis.net/hawaii-legislature-passes-bill-raising-minimum-wage-to-18-your-money/ Wed, 04 May 2022 00:11:34 +0000 https://islandcrisis.net/hawaii-legislature-passes-bill-raising-minimum-wage-to-18-your-money/ HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaiian lawmakers on Tuesday passed legislation that would raise the state’s minimum wage to $18 an hour by 2028, potentially the highest in the nation. Proponents say the increase is badly needed in a state that regularly tops lists for the most expensive housing and cost of living. But some companies warn […]]]>

HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaiian lawmakers on Tuesday passed legislation that would raise the state’s minimum wage to $18 an hour by 2028, potentially the highest in the nation.

Proponents say the increase is badly needed in a state that regularly tops lists for the most expensive housing and cost of living. But some companies warn they will have to downsize or even close because they can’t afford the higher pay.

The $18 minimum would be the highest amount among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. However, some states automatically raise their minimum wage when the cost of living rises, which means places like California, which currently has a $15 minimum wage, could have a higher wage six years from now given the current situation. ‘inflation.

The House and Senate, both controlled by Democrats, approved the measure by wide margins. The bill now falls to Hawaii Governor David Ige, who has said he supports an $18 minimum wage.

The minimum wage in Hawaii is currently $10.10 per hour. The bill would increase the rate in increments over the next few years, starting with $12 on Oct. 1.

House Speaker Scott Saiki said a study showing 42% of Hawaiian households struggled to make ends meet was a big factor behind his support for the increase. The Hawaii State AFL-CIO also approved the move to $18.

Saiki said he wanted the minimum to rise in line with the consumer price index, but lawmakers failed to reach a consensus on that.

A state analysis released in December showed that a single person working 40 hours a week would need to earn $18 an hour to pay for housing and other necessities in Hawaii.

“People should be able to meet their basic needs 40 hours a week,” said Nate Hix, director of Living Wage Hawaii, an advocacy group pushing for a higher minimum wage. “Otherwise people are forced to work multiple jobs or sacrifice their basic needs like food, shelter, clothing.”

The Hawaii Chamber of Commerce said in written testimony that many of its members say they will lay off and some will go out of business with the rate hike. The business group said Hawaii’s unique requirement that employers provide health insurance to those who work more than 20 hours a week already adds $3 to $4 to workers’ hourly compensation.

Michael Miller, operations manager at Tiki’s Grill and Bar, a Waikiki restaurant, favors a gradual increase in the rate to $15 by 2027. He said the costs for everything related to labor will increase with the higher salary.

“Who pays then? The consumer pays for it,” Miller said.

The legislation expands the tip credit to $1.50 by 2028, allowing employers to subtract that amount from the wages they pay if workers earn enough in tips.

The bill makes the earned income tax credit permanent and refundable, which will help low- to middle-income workers reduce the taxes they owe and potentially increase their tax refund. Hawaii’s existing working income tax credit expires this year and is non-refundable, meaning many low-income taxpayers can’t use it because their income is too low to require significant taxes. .

Gerard Dericks, an economics professor at Hawaii Pacific University, said raising the minimum wage to improve living standards focuses on the symptom of the problem, not the underlying cause.

He said it would be better for Hawaii to reduce its cost of living, such as increasing housing by allowing more and taller residential towers to be built in Honolulu. Or by repealing the Jones Act, a 1920 law that requires shipping between U.S. ports to be provided by U.S.-flagged vessels. Proponents of the law say it is important for national security because it helps sustain the US shipbuilding industry.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

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Eric Stinton: “Failing” schools are an easy political target, but the reality is much more complex https://islandcrisis.net/eric-stinton-failing-schools-are-an-easy-political-target-but-the-reality-is-much-more-complex/ Mon, 02 May 2022 10:12:33 +0000 https://islandcrisis.net/eric-stinton-failing-schools-are-an-easy-political-target-but-the-reality-is-much-more-complex/ Last month, Tulsi Gabbard posted a video on Twitter about Florida’s Parental Rights in Education Bill, commonly referred to as the “don’t say gay” bill. She didn’t just applaud the bill to ‘prohibit classroom discussions of sexual orientation or gender identity at certain levels’ – who knows what might happen if children learned that gay […]]]>

Last month, Tulsi Gabbard posted a video on Twitter about Florida’s Parental Rights in Education Bill, commonly referred to as the “don’t say gay” bill. She didn’t just applaud the bill to ‘prohibit classroom discussions of sexual orientation or gender identity at certain levels’ – who knows what might happen if children learned that gay people and trans exist in the world – she accused public schools of “indoctrinating” students with “woke sexual values”.

“The reality we face in this country is that our schools are failing,” Gabbard said, saying one in four high school graduates are “functionally illiterate.”

She continued, “I am convinced that if our schools focused on educating our children, teaching them the basics…we would see our literacy rates improve…That is what our public schools should be on. focus.”

The idea that public schools don’t focus on teaching the fundamentals has surprised those of us who actually spend time in public schools.

Although statistics vary, she is generally correct that a significant number of students graduate with low reading ability. Reading is a fundamental skill for living well and participating in society. It is truly alarming to see adult illiteracy rates as high as they are in the richest country in the history of the world. This is a serious problem; I’m sure Gabbard cares deeply about this and has spent a lot of time responding to it.

But why are so many high school graduates illiterate? According to Gabbard, it’s because the schools failed. This is a serious accusation, and one which requires proof. The problem is that if she tried to prove it, she would have to spend time with public school teachers and students. Worse still, she would find out that she was wrong.

Illiteracy is not just a statistic for me. There are real people who have real reasons for not knowing how to read. I know because I taught them.

The oldest students I taught who couldn’t read were in grades 8 and 9. Without exception, they came from unstable and low-income family backgrounds. Many of them grew up in a home where English was not spoken and the parents had gone to work several minimum wage jobs. Some had parents who were drug addicts, in prison or homeless. Many of them had been abused as children.

I wonder if Gabbard knows the illiteracy statistics of rich kids or kids who grew up with parents who read to them. Gabbard says parents, not schools, “are responsible for their children’s education”, but she seems to think that providing foundational skills like reading is solely the job of schools.

When we really know the students who make up the statistic Gabbard employs, we can understand the problem and implement real solutions. As far as I can tell, Gabbard’s investment in this issue is to use it to score points on social media. If she really cared, she would get involved; and if she got involved, she wouldn’t say that illiteracy is just a consequence of failing schools.

Maui Baldwin HS
Many students who struggle with literacy come from difficult family backgrounds. Ludwig Laab/Civil Beat/2021

A common answer is that if students can’t read, they shouldn’t move on to the next grade. It sounds intuitive, but in study after study, when students are held back in middle school or high school, the likelihood of them dropping out of school increases dramatically.

Even Gabbard would agree that children have a much better chance of learning to read in a classroom than on the street. If we want children to read, we want them to stay in school.

Unfortunately, Gabbard is not alone in her ignorance. A few days after posting this video, State Senate candidate Brenton Awa posted an image of himself holding a sign that read “Demand the DOE teach students financial literacy.”

It’s a good idea – so good, in fact, that most schools already embed financial skills in several content areas. I asked him in the comments if his idea was just to add more curriculum requirements for schools, or if he had a substantive plan for how schools should teach financial literacy.

Although Awa presents himself as a political outsider, his response is what is expected of career politicians: “There can be no more excuses. The system fails these children.

I asked him why he thought the system was broken and whether “the system” only referred to schools. Since this is a subject he has certainly thought about, he chose not to respond.

Since January, Awa has been a substitute teacher at her alma mater, Kahuku High and Intermediate School. It’s admirable, and I hope it gives him a better perspective on these issues than his social media posts suggest.

If the whole education system is failing, as Awa says, does he really think adding financial literacy classes will make a difference? If you’re worried about the health of a fried cheeseburger, is adding a side of baby carrots the answer?

Gabbard and Awa are not the same. Gabbard is a career politician who, as far as I can tell, only cares about Hawaii insofar as she can benefit from identifying with it. I believe Awa is naïve on this issue, but I also think he is genuinely concerned about the local people.

Despite their differences in experience and motivation, they still end up saying similar, misinformed things about education, which are then repeated uncritically by their fans and supporters. How we talk about education matters.

If our plans are only to demand that schools change and nothing else, our efforts will inevitably fail, and we will continue to mistakenly think that schools are the reason for our failures, when in reality it is usually us. who are failing schools.

Leaders are supposed to guide us to solutions, but they can’t if they mislead us about why our problems exist in the first place. Saying “schools are failing” might be a good social media post, but the lack of good social media posts isn’t the problem of local politics. A lack of informed action is.

If you genuinely care about these issues – and by “these issues” I mean “our children” – then you need to demonstrate that you care about these issues by diving into the nuances and making detailed plans.

If you’re worried about literacy rates, you should also be worried about poverty, hunger, and the forces that keep families from getting involved in their children’s education.

If you’re worried about kids not understanding how to save and budget money, you also need to worry about the cost of living and the work environment in which students graduate.

If you say you want to send your children to private schools for “better opportunities,” you need to be specific about what those opportunities are and why they don’t exist in public schools.

These questions are multiple, inseparable from each other. If our plans are only to demand that schools change and nothing else, our efforts will inevitably fail, and we will continue to mistakenly think that schools are the reason for our failures, when in reality it is usually us. who are failing schools.

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Cynthia P. Weiss | Bonner County Daily Bee https://islandcrisis.net/cynthia-p-weiss-bonner-county-daily-bee/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 16:51:10 +0000 https://islandcrisis.net/cynthia-p-weiss-bonner-county-daily-bee/ • Profession: Educator-1973-2022; published writer, Freedom Journals; contractor – TurboCog LLC; American Alliance for Education; Brock tool; • Party Affiliation: Republican • Education: University of Michigan BGS; majors: biology, pre-medicine; français[mineurs-éducationhistoireaméricainesciencespolitiques;HillsdaleCollege-Biologieavancéeethistoireaméricaine;National-LouisUniversity-MAT(MasterofArtsinTeaching)-ScienceandMath;UniversityofBaltimoreLawSchoolAdHocStudentfor1anforInternationalAviationLaw;UniversitédeChicago-CertificationEMTetparamédicale;Formationetcertificationendéveloppementd’emploiplacementenemploi;Certificationsdesancienscombattantsetdesfamillesd’accueil-HawaïetOregon;Grant-Writing-Universitéd’Hawaï[Minors-EducationAmericanHistoryPoliticalScience;HillsdaleCollege-AdvancedBiologyandAmericanhistory;National-LouisUniversity-MAT(MasterofArtsinTeaching)-ScienceandMath;UniversityofBaltimoreLawSchoolAdHocStudentfor1yearforInternationalAviationLaw;UniversityofChicago-EMTandParamedicCertification;TrainingandcertificationinJobDevelopmentJobPlacement;VeteranandFosterCarecertifications-HawaiiandOregonawaii;Grant-Writing-UniversityofHeritage[mineurs-éducationhistoireaméricainesciencespolitiques ;HillsdaleCollege-Biologieavancéeethistoireaméricaine;National-LouisUniversity-MAT(MasterofArtsinTeaching)-ScienceandMath;UniversityofBaltimoreLawSchoolAdHocStudentfor1anforInternationalAviationLaw;UniversitédeChicago-CertificationEMTetparamédicale ;Formationetcertificationendéveloppementd’emploiplacementenemploi ;Certificationsdesancienscombattantsetdesfamillesd’accueil-HawaïetOregon ;Grant-Writing-Universitéd’Hawaï[Minors-EducationAmericanHistoryPoliticalScience;HillsdaleCollege-AdvancedBiologyandAmericanhistory;National-LouisUniversity-MAT(MasterofArtsinTeaching)-ScienceandMath;UniversityofBaltimoreLawSchoolAdHocStudentfor1yearforInternationalAviationLaw;UniversityofChicago-EMTandParamedicCertification;TrainingandcertificationinJobDevelopmentJobPlacement;VeteranandFosterCarecertifications-HawaiiandOregon;Grant-Writing-UniversityofHawaii • How many years as a resident of Bonner County: 5 • Civil status: Married • Family: 3 adult children living in Nevada, Arizona […]]]>


• Profession: Educator-1973-2022; published writer, Freedom Journals; contractor – TurboCog LLC; American Alliance for Education; Brock tool;

• Party Affiliation: Republican

• Education: University of Michigan BGS; majors: biology, pre-medicine; français[mineurs-éducationhistoireaméricainesciencespolitiques;HillsdaleCollege-Biologieavancéeethistoireaméricaine;National-LouisUniversity-MAT(MasterofArtsinTeaching)-ScienceandMath;UniversityofBaltimoreLawSchoolAdHocStudentfor1anforInternationalAviationLaw;UniversitédeChicago-CertificationEMTetparamédicale;Formationetcertificationendéveloppementd’emploiplacementenemploi;Certificationsdesancienscombattantsetdesfamillesd’accueil-HawaïetOregon;Grant-Writing-Universitéd’Hawaï[Minors-EducationAmericanHistoryPoliticalScience;HillsdaleCollege-AdvancedBiologyandAmericanhistory;National-LouisUniversity-MAT(MasterofArtsinTeaching)-ScienceandMath;UniversityofBaltimoreLawSchoolAdHocStudentfor1yearforInternationalAviationLaw;UniversityofChicago-EMTandParamedicCertification;TrainingandcertificationinJobDevelopmentJobPlacement;VeteranandFosterCarecertifications-HawaiiandOregonawaii;Grant-Writing-UniversityofHeritage[mineurs-éducationhistoireaméricainesciencespolitiques ;HillsdaleCollege-Biologieavancéeethistoireaméricaine;National-LouisUniversity-MAT(MasterofArtsinTeaching)-ScienceandMath;UniversityofBaltimoreLawSchoolAdHocStudentfor1anforInternationalAviationLaw;UniversitédeChicago-CertificationEMTetparamédicale ;Formationetcertificationendéveloppementd’emploiplacementenemploi ;Certificationsdesancienscombattantsetdesfamillesd’accueil-HawaïetOregon ;Grant-Writing-Universitéd’Hawaï[Minors-EducationAmericanHistoryPoliticalScience;HillsdaleCollege-AdvancedBiologyandAmericanhistory;National-LouisUniversity-MAT(MasterofArtsinTeaching)-ScienceandMath;UniversityofBaltimoreLawSchoolAdHocStudentfor1yearforInternationalAviationLaw;UniversityofChicago-EMTandParamedicCertification;TrainingandcertificationinJobDevelopmentJobPlacement;VeteranandFosterCarecertifications-HawaiiandOregon;Grant-Writing-UniversityofHawaii

• How many years as a resident of Bonner County: 5

• Civil status: Married

• Family: 3 adult children living in Nevada, Arizona and Oregon

• Hobbies: Studying the United States Constitution and defending it at the cost of my life; read and learn new things; Help protect God’s creations: Idaho’s families, children, seniors, animals, and natural resources; gardening; chicken breeding; cooking and baking; tutoring (volunteering); Help for veterans (volunteer)

• Email: cynthiaweissforidstaterep@yahoo.com

  1. Implementing a plan to restore parents’ rights, protect our children and save our rural way of life. We will fight together to restore our Constitution (Article V, a Convention of States;) the only way to restore our individual rights; stop the madness in our schools; and stop Washington’s overreach.

With your support, I am the only person who can lead our state to make school choice and vouchers a reality. Idaho will have the best education and our children will be able to stay in Idaho with great jobs. Then work to eliminate all taxes except sales tax.

  1. Politicians tell you what you want to hear to get you to vote for them, then leave empty promises.

  2. Taxes on property, food, gasoline (energy) and medicine.

  3. Child safety – at school, against CRT, drugs and

  4. Selling Idaho’s farms, ranches, timberlands, and natural resources to outsiders and those who wish to destroy our America and Idaho. Our governor with the help of the federal government sold a gold mine to China, our sworn enemy.

  5. What are your solutions? (Be specific please)

  6. Draft legislation and follow the process to adopt it and cancel the mentioned taxes and replace them with a consumption tax.

  7. Completely overhauling childrearing by introducing an entirely new system for the 21st century, which I designed and implemented in Hawaii. It has been very popular with parents, students and the community. As of 2020, a Supreme Court decision was the missing piece we needed when it was discussed in 2017.

  8. Introduce a bill to make it illegal to sell land to foreigners and prevent any natural resources, including food businesses.

  9. Yes, the county should impose impact fees on new developments, especially if the developers are from outside of Idaho. They cause immense harm to our rural way of life; will cost “We the People” more; and rising cost of ownership. Wealthy people escaping to Idaho buy property at rates much more affordable to them, but drastically increase the cost of homes and land, often knocking prices away from Idahoans’ dreams of home ownership. The costs for more infrastructure are steadily rising and the developers are making huge profits and the people of Idaho are suffering.

  10. No. There is an overreach of government at the local, state and federal levels. Politicians make promises so we vote for them. They find excuses when they fail. When they break their promises, they leave us with voter remorse. “We the people” are the government. Elected bureaucrats forget that. Fire those who don’t protect our way of life in Idaho and our Republic. I do what I say and I don’t compromise on my principles. Vote for an honest leader who knows what to do, how to do it, and succeeds when others fail. I never gave up. I promise.

  11. Candidates and conservative organizations that endorse only one candidate for each position and say that person is the only person qualified to be endorsed, before and without all candidates having the opportunity to participate in their forums before the selection is made .

I can’t talk about it because it’s too late for the primary. But it is an issue that I will address before the November elections, if necessary.

  1. The need to support North Idaho College to provide practical coursework and certification for students who wish to work in the Panhandle to have high-paying jobs and stay in Idaho instead of having to leave Idaho. There are major problems with the school at the moment. It is essential that concerned residents and parents actively help correct these issues that will affect all Idahoans in future and present generations. Several candidates have studied there, but have never talked about it.

  2. I am a conservative, Constitution-loving Christian Republican. I believe that I can win through my achievements and my creative and unique solutions. This is my first and last rodeo. I don’t take PAC money, nor can my principles be bought. I am never influenced by lobbyists and special interest groups. What do I say to people who tell me I should quit because I don’t have enough money to get votes? I say not everyone who votes should be bought off. I’ll win every vote because I’m the most qualified candidate, and people know I’m for you.

  3. What question should each candidate be asked? What is your answer? You say you believe in the Constitution of the United States. Do you believe that Article V and the States Convention is the only way “We the People” can amend the Constitution to limit the terms of Congress and prevent them from passing laws and exempting themselves from laws what do they impose on us? Why or why not?

Answer: Yes, I know this is the only way to stop the government’s excesses and pass amendments to rule and kick the federal government out of Idaho and reclaim the 63% of our lands and resources that were supposed to be held in trust. until Idaho becomes a state. Totally against the law.

  1. The Constitution of the United States as ratified is a perfect document, inspired by God. It must be restored so that “We the People” regains our freedoms and our individual rights. The Federal Government is acting unconstitutionally and must be restored: to give life, liberty and the pursuit of our dreams, as free people, the individual, the family being the primary rights necessary to protect the sovereignty of our Republic and state rights.

I ask for your vote because my practical plans are built on my success in making things happen, against all odds. If I am lucky enough to gain your trust, I solemnly swear to you that I will never betray you. You won’t have any voter’s remorse.

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Growing push seeks to stop state taking millions from foster children https://islandcrisis.net/growing-push-seeks-to-stop-state-taking-millions-from-foster-children/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 02:09:00 +0000 https://islandcrisis.net/growing-push-seeks-to-stop-state-taking-millions-from-foster-children/ HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) — Over the past four years, Hawaii has taken more than $1.5 million from foster children in the form of Social Security payments and survivor benefits. The state says it uses the money to ensure these children are taken care of. But critics argue it’s not state money to spend, and now there’s […]]]>

HONOLULU (HawaiiNewsNow) — Over the past four years, Hawaii has taken more than $1.5 million from foster children in the form of Social Security payments and survivor benefits.

The state says it uses the money to ensure these children are taken care of.

But critics argue it’s not state money to spend, and now there’s pressure to change the little-known policy.

“Quite frankly, it’s very unfair,” said State Representative Patrick Branco, who recently proposed a resolution calling on the state to end its practice of using children’s Social Security benefits to pay for their care. .

This would make Hawaii the second state in the country to change policy.

“I consider DHS not entitled to this money,” Branco said.

“They already have a hard life”

Vanessa Lucas, 19, left the foster home last year after graduating from Pearl City High School.

She is one of those whose survivor benefits were taken away by the state.

Lucas says being alone is hard and the responsibilities are endless.

“When I was in high school, I always wanted to graduate,” she said. “And it’s like now, I want to go back.”

She says having no parents ― or anyone really ― to fall back on makes it even harder.

“I have a little brother,” Lucas said. “Being separated when we were in care was difficult just because that’s when we needed each other the most.”

Her father died when she was 7, making her eligible for Social Security survivor benefits.

“I was getting at least one large a month,” she said.

This is money she could have claimed once she turned 18.

But what Lucas didn’t know was that once she entered foster care, the state applied to receive the funds on her behalf and then began using them to pay her parents. adoptive. Meanwhile, foster children who are not eligible for income or Social Security benefits do not have to pay anything.

Forced to do it all on her own, Lucas now joins others in advocating for change so that others like her can have more of a safety net and a chance to truly succeed.

“They already have a tough life, you know,” Lucas said of the foster kids. “That would help them a lot.”

“We are not preparing children to succeed”

There are nearly 3,000 children in Hawaii’s foster care system.

On average, the state received Social Security payments on behalf of 37 young people per year between 2018 and 2021. Those benefits over that period totaled nearly $1.5 million.

“It is placed in a trust account in our state general fund,” said Daisy Hartsfield, administrator of the state Department of Social Services. She says that if the money was not taken from the accounts of these children, the state would have to foot the bill.

Indeed, for the vast majority of youth in foster care, DHS can seek partial federal reimbursement to help cover the cost of their care.

“However, for children who receive these benefits from the SSI or SS program, they are not eligible for this same type of reimbursement,” Hartsfield said.

Branco, the lawmaker, says foster care is a service that no child should have to pay for.

“By doing this, we’re not setting kids up for success,” he said.

“Three to four percent of them, that’s the national average, actually go to college when they come out of foster care programs. In my opinion, it is their money for their future.

“I have all these bills to pay”

Lucas says that one day she would like to become a flight attendant.

“But, I don’t know,” she said, considering the idea.

Right now, it’s a dream the 19-year-old isn’t sure she can accomplish on her own.

When she graduated, there was $16,000 in her trust account. That was what was left for the state, which deducted all the payments from her foster family: $776 a month.

She is one of the lucky ones. Some children end up with nothing.

Lucas said she did her best to make it last.

“But I have all these bills to pay,” she said.

Hartsfield said the state is “open to reviewing and re-evaluating our current policy and programs. If we can come up with something better, we will definitely consider it. »

The agency added that there are also several programs available for young people in foster care to help them transition into adulthood.

Copyright 2022 Hawaii News Now. All rights reserved.

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